Monday, January 03, 2011

Quilted Wine Tote Sewing Tutorial


I am excited to share the tutorial for this wine tote bag that I mentioned earlier!  I had fun playing around and coming up with the pattern.  I have seen lots of patterns online for wine gift bags, but I wanted to make something that was more of a reusable wine tote, inspired by this BuiltNY tote.  One of these would make a great housewarming, hostess, or holiday gift, but it would also be great to make and keep for yourself.  I find we are often heading out to a dinner party or other gathering and grab a bottle of wine on the way out the door - and it ends up awkwardly stuffed in my purse, halfway sticking out.  So I am sure we will get a lot of use out of these new totes!  Even better, since they are made with two layers of quilt batting, if you wanted to really do it right, you could make one layer out of insulated batting and then the tote would help to keep white wine cool during transit, too.  If you make a wine tote with this tutorial I would love to see how it turned out - you can share a photo in the Needle and Spatula Flickr group.


TERMS OF USE:  For personal, non-commercial use only.  If you are interested in making these totes for small-scale commercial sales (eg craft fairs, etsy), please contact me and we can discuss a licensing agreement.

What you will need:
  • Printout of Pattern PDF - DOWNLOAD HERE (note - I changed this from google docs because people were having trouble downloading and with the sizing - this should work better.  Let me know if you have a problem).
  • 2 fat quarters of fabric (or slightly less will work - see below for the pieces you need to cut)
  • 4 rectangles of quilt batting, each 7.5"x16" plus two squares roughly 5"x5"
  • About 1/2 yard of 1/2" double fold bias tape - I made my own for one bag and used pre-made for the other, either way is fine
  • Coordinating thread

I used quilting weight fabric for both the outer fabric and the lining, but you could use home dec weight fabric on the outside and possibly skip one layer of batting and/or only lightly quilt it.  I used a pretty lightweight batting and decided to double it up to give this project more heft, but if you used a high-loft batting you might only need one layer (two rectangles of batting rather than four).  Also, the pattern as written is not too snug, if you want it to be more snug-fitting, you could make the outer fabric pieces below 6" wide rather than 6 and 3/8" wide.

The instructions below are for the simpler version with a single fabric on the outside and a single lining fabric - but you can easily piece two pieces together to make a two-fabric version of the outside (or you could do some other more complicated patchwork design).  The most time-intensive part of this project for me was the quilting, if you want to do a quicker version you could significantly simplify or just omit the quiting and it would be fine.

Cut out the two pattern pieces from the printed-out pattern.  Put the handle pattern piece aside for now and then cut the following pieces out of the fabric and batting (sorry the circle pieces are not pictured below):
  • Out of the outer fabric, two rectangles 6 and 3/8"x15" and one circle (cut out according to the pattern) - I am using Robert Kaufman Metro Cafe as my outer fabric (love this!).
  • Out of the lining fabric, two rectangles 7 1/4" x16" and a rough circle/square about 1/2" larger on all sides than the circle fabric piece - I am using Amy Butler Love as my lining fabric.
  • Out of the batting, the rectangles described above (four 7.5"x16" rectangles) and also a rough circle/square about 1/2" larger on all sides than the circle pattern piece.
[Edited to add: some folks have asked why the lining and batting are cut larger than the outer fabric - this is so that you don't have to worry about making sure everything is perfectly aligned when quilting (and in case it shifts during quilting) - similar to how you cut your batting and backing larger than a quilt top when making a quilt.  Feel free to skip if you think you can keep it lined up without doing the back/batting larger.]


Using the handle pattern piece, on your outer pieces only, lay the fabric wrong side up and then place the pattern piece on the fabric so that the top of the handle is about 1/8" below the top of the rectangle.  Then, trace the inside of the handle opening - you do not need to trace the top of the handle yet.  Inside the oval that you traced, mark a dotted line about 1/4" in as shown below.  Repeat on the second rectangle.  The solid line will be your sewing line and the dotted line will be your cutting line (this is the only part of the pattern where you have to add a seam allowance).


On the outer lining rectangles, repeat this tracing except this time place the pattern 1/2"-3/4" down from the top of the rectangle and center the pattern piece horizontally.


Repeat on the batting with the same alignment as the lining fabric, except this time you only need to trace the oval, you do not need to add a dotted line/seam allowance.


Once you have traced the oval on the four fabric rectangles and the four batting rectangles, go ahead and cut out the inside of the ovals - on the dotted line/seam allowance for the pieces of fabric and on the solid line for the batting pieces.


Lay one piece each of the outer and lining fabrics together, right sides facing, and line up the oval holes, making sure the edges of the rectangles are parallel.  Pin in place if you desire, then sew around the solid line of the oval.  Clip from the seam allowance in to just before the seam (making sure not to cut the seam) in a few places at the tight curve at either end of the oval.  Repeat for the other two rectangles.   With the outer side on the top, lay two pieces of batting on top and align all of the ovals.


Reach through the hole and grab the lining fabric from the other side, and pull it through the hole.  It will be kind of awkward at first as shown on the left below, but you should be able to tug at it and pull it into shape so that it lies mostly flat.  You can iron if you need to to get both sides to lie flat.


With the outer side up, top stitch the oval handle 1/8" from the edge and then quilt each piece as desired (this just means sew all the layers together).  If you have a free-motion quilting foot you can do free motion quilting but you can also do straight line quilting either with or without a walking foot and it should be fine.  Be careful to quilt away from the handle so that you don't inadvertently end up with a weird bulge/fold there in your quilting.  Or feel free to skip the quilting, it really is more decorative and the tote will work fine without it.  Once you have quilted the pieces, lay the handle pattern piece on top and trace the top of the handle, then cut out the top of the handle shape (through all the layers) and also trim the bottom layers to match the top at the sides and bottom.   Make sure the two pieces are the same height - you can trim further if necessary to get them to match.  Also, I didn't take a picture of this but you should also make a quilt sandwich with the bottom circles and quilt that sandwich, then trim it to the actual circle shape of the top circle (outer fabric) - let me know if this is confusing.


From here, I tried a few different ways to do the construction and deal with the inside seams, so I will describe the options and you can choose what makes the most sense for you.  The first version I sewed the side and bottom seams and then went back and covered them with bias tape, but this seemed more intensive then necessary.  The second time (shown immediately below), I sewed the side and bottom seams and then I went back and zig-zagged over the seams, securing all the layers together.  The third time (shown second), I zig-zagged the edges of each piece before I seamed it, which also worked fine and was a little easier on the machine than zig-zagging through all the layers (and easier to make sure I caught all the layers). 

Whichever way you decide to do these final steps, as far as the actual construction goes, first you lay the two rectangle pieces with the handles right sides together and seam only the sides with 1/4" seam allowance (or slightly less) - do not sew the bottom edges together.


This is the edge where I zig-zagged it after seaming:

Then take the quilted circle piece and pin it in place in the bottom opening.  You may have to tug it a bit to get it to line up, I find it helpful to pin it at each side at the seams first and then pin the rest of the way around each side.  Sew a seam 1/4" in, being careful to catch all of the layers and removing the pins before you get to them.


Then on this version I zig-zagged it all in place after I seamed it:


Here is how it looked for the later bag where I zig-zagged before seaming:



Finally, you apply the binding to the top edge of the handle.  As described in this tutorial, you can either sew it on all at once (one-step) or you can open it up and sew one edge, then fold it over and sew the other edge (two-step).  I tried both and wasn't 100% thrilled with the way either one turned out but I guess I just need to practice more with bias tape.  Either way, you will apply the bias tape with the bag still turned inside-out... it is a bit fussy to sew with the bag in the way but if you go slow you should be able to get it to work.

To do the two step approach, first you open the tape up and pin/place the open edge along the edge you are going to be applying it to.  Make sure to fold the end over so that you get a neat seam, then sew along the first fold line.  (If this isn't making sense and/or you haven't used bias tape before, check out a tutorial and hopefully that will help).


Sorry this picture is crummy, I ran out of light.  After you sew it in place all the way around, flip it up and then fold it over to the other side.


Sew in place, either by sewing on the inside or the outside (your preference), making sure to catch the inside edge to secure it.


To do the one-step approach, you just slip the bias tape over the edge and sew it on, being careful to catch both the top and the bottom (this is the part I always have trouble with).  You can be more sure to catch both layers if you use a zig-zag, so if you like the way that looks that is a bit easier.  At the end, fold under the end before you sew it in place to make it look nice and finished.


Turn it right-side out and there you go, enjoy your new wine tote!  I hope you like the tutorial, let me know if you have any questions or feedback!

104 comments:

  1. Great idea! Thanks for the tutorial. :-)

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  2. Those are adorable. I think I'll make a bunch as gifts for next Christmas.

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  3. These are amazing! They almost make me want to go buy a sewing machine right this second. But I think my boyfriend might have a heart attack if he sees me sewing something.

    Truly, I just might do it. xo

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  4. Great tutorial - thanks for sharing. Like Megan, think I will make a load for next Christmas.

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  5. I love this!! I am going to make one, maybe two for my sister, her birthday is at the end of the month! Thanks for an awesome tutorial.

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  6. I've made two of these now. They are fun to make.http://www.flickr.com/photos/55232626@N07/?saved=1

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  7. I made another one because I gave the other two away to friends who thought they were so neat!! I wish I could get better with the bias tape...it's tricky!!

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  8. Hey there Kate! We love this crafty tutorial of yours and we want to share it with other sewers and quilters by featuring a link on www.WeAllSew.com! We’ll be featuring a link to your project at our "Free Stuff" page all next week. Please let me know if you have any questions about being featured at WeAllSew.com. Thanks so much-Erika

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  9. Wow, I love this tutorial. I've been looking for a wine tote pattern for ages, and this is perfect. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. Thanks for the tutorial! Great idea!!!

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  11. This is amazing and will make the perfect gift for a few ladies I know. Thank you for the tut, found you through Craft Gossip :)

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  12. Great project! I just wanted to let you know that we featured this project on our Facebook page with over 13,000 fans. We’d love it if you’d use our Featured Blogger button, available at: http://www.dailycraft.com/thank-you-for-crafting/. Our audience loved the project and we look forward to sharing more from you. Please let us know if you have any questions or projects you’d love us to feature! Thanks!

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  13. We are visting family this summer and I needed to take a few hotess gifts. This is perfect. I'm lining mine with Insul Bright to help keep the bottle of wine chilled. Thank you!

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  14. Love this...top of the list project!

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  15. Ok, so I made one, but it looks REALLY small. I used a 1/4" seam allowance. What size wine bottle does it hold?

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  16. Hi Erin - The pattern is designed to fit a standard wine bottle. Are you sure that you printed the pattern at 100%? It seems like if you print it straight from google docs rather than downloading the PDF and printing that, it may not be printing at the correct size. I'm really sorry if that happened to you! I am going to try to put the file on a different kind of service to avoid this problem in the future.

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  17. Thanks for the tutorial! http://selfishlyhappy.blogspot.com/2011/07/craft-wine-tote.html

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  18. I couldn't download the handle or bottom it came out just black paper could you send me a link for it.

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  19. Thanks so much for this great tutorial. I made 2 on the weekend for gifts and they turned out wonderfully. I had no problems at all. Thanks again!

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  20. Very clever! Congratulations!

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  21. I love the tot but when I print the pattern at 100% its just the handles and the circle seems quite small is this right how long do I need to make the sides oF the pattern?
    Thanks Helen

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  22. The pattern only shows the handle and bottom - read the tutorial above and it will explain the rest. Thanks.

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  23. I love this wine tote..I would like to make it to fit two wine bottles though as I hate when the bottles clink against each other when you get it from the store and they give you a bag. Any Ideas on how to join the two cylinders together so there is cushioning between the two bottles still? Also I would probably have to change the handles so they go on either side of the two bottles and are long enough to join. I'm not crafty enough to figure this out myself :) thanks.

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  24. I'm wondering if you used quilted fabric would you still need the batting?

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  25. A hint for bias tape application, one side is a tiny bit wider than the other, than side goes on the bottom. If you intend to do quite a few, there are also a few styles of bias tape feet for sewing machines.

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  26. I am trying to keep this pattern can you please tell me how to do it. Thanks Michelle

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  27. If you use quilted fabric you don't need the batting and lining fabric - but the bag will be thinner since the pattern calls for two layers of batting.

    And I'm not sure how you would make a double wine tote - this may not be the best pattern to try to adapt for that. Good luck!

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  28. this is so cute...i've got another wine tote pattern but it has handles that you sew on i really like the oval on this pattern....gotta try it now!!

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  29. I made 2 of these. I found that if I serged the edges after I quilted and before I sewed the 2 pieces together it was easier. Also I sewed one side together, layed it flat and then did the binding. I used the extra wide double fold, sewed it on using the one step method and used a decorative stitch then stitched up the 2nd side and added the bottom circle. It was lots easier. When I can get a picture of them I'll post it. Thanks for the great tutorial!!!

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    1. what a great idea! I'm halfway through the project and will definitely do this! Thanks for sharing the tip!

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  30. Looooooove this! I saw it on Pintrest. Looks like you have some awesome other projects!

    I'm following you now :) I'd love if you checked out my blog when you get a chance!

    jamie@sewrockin.com

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  31. Love this pattern, spent this afternoon making one for me. Thankyou for sharing your pattern. Kathy'slittle hint works a treat. Thankyou.

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  32. I'm going to try this but I am going to lengthen the body and make a flat square bottom...I'll see if it works. That would eliminate the circle step. I think it would work just as well. I love the handles...such a nice way to carry it rather than the usual drawstring. I'm also thinking one could take apart the bottle gift bag for a pattern...something like the coffee holder.

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  33. Loved this Tutorial. Already made one, sewed my finger when putting on the bottom. Will be taking my Quilted Wine Tote to Wine Club next month so I can be all the rage. Learning how to blog but as soon as I figure it out I will be adding this awesome tute to it.

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  34. Great tutorial! You've been featured on the Quality Sewing Tutorials blog.

    We hand select only the best free tutorials and patterns for home sewers.

    Grab a brag button!

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  35. I have old quilts that are beyond repair for bedding. They will make really great wine totes. Thanks for the pattern and idea.

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  36. I love this tutorial and the bag is adorable. I really want to try and make one but I'm curious to know how you made the loop effect on the outside. Do you think you could post some pictures? Thanks! ER from Eleanor's Revolt

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  37. Along with Kathy's comment from Oct. 19, you could make the tote reversible that way too if you really wanted to have it reversible. Add a little fringed trim to the side seams. Thanks for posting this very useful fun tote. I've been sewing for 50 years and love to see so many people interested in sewing!

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  38. GIRL!!!!!!!!!!!! I just made this and I am over the top proud of myself. It was so easy to follow your directions. I have to admit the bias tape part nearly killed me. But I love the end results! Gonna have to go somewhere with a bottle of wine to show it off. Thanks for sharing your skills!

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  39. Nice idea, it must also try to sew this :)

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  40. i just finished this tote for a wine gift i am giving. love it!! i am a quilter so i used the french binding method for the bias tape; sew the outside with the machine and finish the inside by hand. thanks for the pattern and tutorial.

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  41. This tutorial is really helpful i really love making bag like tote bag.Thanks for sharing it for us.

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  42. Thanks for the tutorial. I managaged to find some stretch seam binding for the top that worked very well. It doesn't frey

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  43. Thanks for sharing this. I love it!
    Well designed, well documented. Your instructions are clear, and your photos are useful.

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  44. Made it tonight for my Kiddo's teacher - loved it! Thanks!!

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  45. Two of my favorite things, wine and sewing!
    Thanks, I'll have to make some of these. I'm thinking I'd like to use some Insul brite inside mine for chilled wine.

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  46. Fun! Just made my first one. I used Insul brite and a layer of batting. Can't wait to do more.

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  47. I really like this pattern. I am having trouble sewing the bottom circle to the sides. The circle seems too big. There is just too much fabric to try to ease in....any suggestions? It is not flat like the pictures after sewing together.

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    1. The outside of the bottom circle will seem too big to line up because it includes a seam allowance - so make sure that you are pinning the pieces together 1/4 in from the edge of each piece, and try using more pins. Other than that I would suggest sewing slowly and maybe trying sewing with the bottom facing down rather than up (if you weren't already doing that). Hope that helps!

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  48. Could I possibly use double-sided quilted fabric to make this? I'm not much of a quilter, but I can sew. I was also thinking that this bag would make a great knitting needle bag, or a project bag too.

    It is such a lovely idea. Thanks so much for sharing!

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    1. You could probably use double-sided quilted fabric, but you would have to figure out how to finish the inside of the handles somehow. Or you could try doing a little quilting - it's a small project so good be a good one to try your hand!

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  49. It was easier to sew with the bottom facing the bottom the bottom. The edges are suppose to be together and then stitch 1/4" from the edge...correct?
    Mine does not sit flat. The bottom shows when you set it on the table even when you place a wine bottle inside. You didn't mention clipping the curves? I notice your examples sit flat and the view of the bottom is all flat. Do you have any suggestions?
    Thank you!

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    1. It's not necessarily that the edges are supposed to line up and then you sew 1/4" from the edge - it's more like you line them up 1/4" in, where the seam where go. You could try clipping the curves if you want.

      Also, are you sure that you printed the pattern at 100% and trimmed the two side pieces to the sizes indicated in the tutorial? Other than that I don't think that I have any other suggestions, but I hope it works out well!

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  50. Do you prewash your fabric before constructing the wine tote?
    The wine tote is a great design and is much nicer than just a plain bag.
    Thanks so much for sharing it!

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    1. I prewash my fabrics generally for my projects, but it should be ok to use unwashed fabrics too.

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  51. I have made so many of these. Everyone loves them! I have used them for many things- made them shorter for children gift bags and wider for Easter egg baskets. On these I just put in a box bottom. These are so easy to personalize before the side seams are done. I also use french seams (add 1/2 inch on each side to do this) on some so they are totally finished on the inside.
    Thank you so much for sharing.

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  52. Try french seams after you apply the binding on each side. Should be easier. If you make your pattern longer you can make a squared bottom and skip the circle on the bottom.
    Nancy

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  53. Loved it but totally lost at pulling the fabric through the hole. I just couldn't make out the process prior to that. Pitty I have just the family member that could use one .

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    1. Make sure that when yo put it together they you have the right sides of the fabric facing together. You just lay the batting on top and stick your hand through the side you layed the batting on. when you pull the fabric through you are only pulling the lining through the hole. make sure that when you sewed around the hole that the rights sides are facing each other. I had to rip mine and resew it. The instructions just say right sides facing instead of right sides facing each other. Hope this helps and did not confuse you more.

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  54. love this. Im always looking for something different for gifts. I saw a pattern for a set of coasters made from charms but now I cant find it anywhere. Would you have one?
    Thanks for sharing.

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  55. Just finished making one of these cute little Wine Totes for one of my church group's monthly meetings. Whoever is hostess for the month furnishes a little "door prize", and it's my turn and I thought this would be wonderful with a non-alcoholic beverage inside as a gift. I followed your directions to a "T" and it came out just perfect. I'm thrilled that I have something cute to make up for hostess gifts or Birthdays, Anniversaries or Christmas. I'm definitely going to make me one. Another cute idea would be to put a really nice bottle of fancy olive oil in this little bag to give as a hostess gift to those people who love to cook a lot. Thanks again for sharing this pattern!!!

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    1. I think your idea of a bottle of olive oil is brilliant! Gave me pause to think of other bottles that might work as well....IE: special shampoo (just make the tote smaller) bath oil, etc. Sometimes we just need a little brain boost to get us to think outside the box! Thanks so much for your post. Going to get started on one today.

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  56. I was unable to download the pattern.

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    1. Sorry to hear the link wasn't working for you - if you email me (link in the sidebar) I can email it to you.

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  57. I just made 2 of these for gifts!! I'm so excited I found this on pinterest thank you!

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  58. Great tutorial. I bought a pattern similar to this but the instructions were not very clear. You have done a great job of explaining the steps.

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  59. Excellent tutorial. I made one for my daughter's birthday today, All Souls Day, with Dia de los Muertos fabric. She'll get it tonight.

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  60. I found you through someone's board on Pinterest -- what a great tutorial -- thank you so much for taking the time and effort to share this! Can't wait to try it!!

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  61. Thanks for this great pattern. I'm making one for my secret pal for Christmas! She's going to love it!

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  62. Thank you so much for posting this!!! i am going to attempt my first one tonight, if goes well that will be for my soon to be sis in law for her Grad gift and then will make a few more for Christmas gifts!!!!

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  63. What a wonderful pattern! Thank you so much for sharing!

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  64. I love this pattern. Made one out of denim with machine embroidery on it. It turned out great! I expect to be making more of these. Thank you so much for sharing your tutorial.

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  65. A friend of mine made one of these and gave it to me at our Christmas party. I love how it looks. I was going to use her's as a pattern, but then someone else referred me to your site. Thank you so much for such a great tutorial. Hopefully after Christmas I'll have time to try it out.

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  66. This looks awesome. Thanks so much for sharing. Is there a way to post this to Pinterest?
    Lori

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    1. Hi, if you have the pin it button installed on your browser you should be able to pin using that. Hope that helps!

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  67. I love these! I am a wine tasting consultant with Wine Shop at Home and Iam thinking these would be a great gift for my hostesses! Guess I had better print this for my mother in law. Thank you

    www.wineshopathome.com/carriepatton

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  68. This so so cute! I can't wait to pick up a few fat quarters and make some of these. What a great way to "wrap" a bottle of wine for a gift.

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  69. I love the handles on these--Cute! I'm going to make some enclosing the seam as I've done on similar projects. Directions are below; I hope they make sense.

    Sew the two sides wrong sides together with a 1/4" seam. Turn the bag inside out so wrong sides are on the outside. Pin the two sides together 1/2" from the seam, then sew where pinned, enclosing your first stitching. Turn bag right side out; your last stitching will be a finished look inside the bag.

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  70. I made one last night for friends' 40th wedding anniversary-the symbol is ruby so I used deep red fabric and after all over stippling, I embellished with tiny red Swarovski crystals and an indinkra charm from Lisa Sheperd Stewart's "Cultured Expressions"-used the crocodile indinkra representing "adaptability," an important trait if you want to stay married that long! I enclosed red wine to complete the ruby theme. Thank you Kate for a wonderful, easy pattern! Hope you can figure out how to make it reversible....

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  71. This looks realy nice, thanks for sharing. I´m going to make one for me :)

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  72. Does anyone sell these by chance? I do not know how to quilt but a friend does, I would love to be able to give this as a gift!

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    1. Sorry, I am not aware of anyone selling these online at this time.

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  73. i am trying to figure out if i printed the pattern in the correct size before i get through the whole project. the ovals seem small. is there any way you could tell me how long it is supposed to be? or how far in from the edge (approx) it should be? or maybe the diameter of the circle? anything to give me the reassurance that i have the right sizes.
    thanks!

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    1. The circle for the base of the tote should measure 4 1/8" and the inside of the handle is 2 3/4" wide - it is not a super wide handle (I guess I have small hands?) but you could always modify the pattern if you wanted it to have a bigger handle. Hope that helps!

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  74. Quelle bonne idée !! Merci pour le tuto !!

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  75. Really love this.Will make such great Christmas gifts with a nice bottle!

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  76. Just made one in LSU colored chevron or my neighbor. it was super easy and I love how it came out.

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  77. Hi Kate- I downloaded the pattern but it is really small. HELP!! Can you help? I don't know what the trick is to get it the proper size. Thanks.

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    1. Make sure you select page scaling set to "none" when you're printing (or if there is a % size option set it to 100%). Other than that, I'm not sure what the issue could be. Hope that works!

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  78. I love making this tote for christmas gifts this year. One thing I did find to be easier was to pin all the 2 pieces of batting and 2 pieces of fabric together for one side. Mark 1 circle on your top piece of batting, sew the circle for the handle, then cut out the inside circle and follow the instructions after that. It sped up the process for me to not have to mark and cut out 4 circles per side. Just a suggestion. Thanks for the great tutotial!

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  79. Thanks for shari g this pattern with us. i have now tried it out, together with four friends . We had a lovely weekend. Already gifted one of them. Love from sølvi in Norway

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  80. Great tutorial, thanks for sharing! I made it for my brother in law.
    www.lisipatch.blogspot.com

    Lidia

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  81. Great tutorial, thanks for sharing! I made it for my brother in law.
    www.lisipatch.blogspot.com

    Lidia

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  82. I made this for a fun challenge with some friends (www.fatquarterchallenge.com). Here's how it turned out: http://www.nickandaprilduda.com/2013/11/fatquarterchallenge.html

    Thanks for the great tutorial. I'm a total newbie when it comes to sewing!

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  83. Thank you for the tutorial! Very good idea !!! Excuses my english, but I'm French and my english is very bad !!!
    I prepare the christmas presents and I made it this week end. Thank you very more.

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  84. I do not often leave comments, but I want to let you know that this tutorial is SO well written (and I have used a lot). I am probably at an intermediate level for sewing, so I can figure out most even if they are not very detailed or accurate. This one was really a treat to use such a well thought-out and descriptive tutorial. Thank you so much for sharing it!

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  85. Customized your pattern using slightly larger seam allowances and just completed making it out of faux fur. Turned out well, so THANK YOU for the excellent tutorial. ☺ -Brenda-
    Footnote: For those using your method and are having difficulty adding the bias tape I think adding it prior to the sewing up the last side seam should make it a bit easier plus it will eliminate the finishing of its raw edge. Also; attach the wider side of it to the wrong side (inside of the bag) first .... then flip the remaining portion (narrower side) over to the right side of the bag and top stitch into place .... then complete your side seam.

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    Replies
    1. I'll certainly take your advice when I make this wine tote again. Your method does sound a lot easier.

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  86. Great design! I made one this Saturday afternoon to take as a hostess gift at a Christmas party Saturday night. It took only a few hours with several interruptions and a temperamental serger. Anyway, it turned out great and got rave reviews from the hostess and her other guests. Unfortunately, I didn't get a chance to photograph it before taking it to the party. I'll certainly make another and will post a photo. Thanks!

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